Now Anyone Can Use iWork on the Web

Apple has taken the iWork suite of applications out of Beta status on iCloud, and now anyone can create an account and use Pages, Numbers, or Keynote for free. This is significant because now you can create, share and collaborate on documents, presentations, or spreadsheets even if the other person doesn’t have a Mac, iPhone or iPad. I have personally been very happy with the web versions of Pages, Keynote, and Numbers and have used each repeatedly in my web browser on my Windows machine.

iCloud.com login Accounts are created by using a valid email address that is not already associated with an Apple device (if you already have created an iCloud account on a Mac, iPhone, or iPad, you already have free access to these applications with your existing account). Just visit iCloud.com to create your account or login to an existing account. Once you login you will see icons for Pages, Keynote, and Numbers and you can instantly start creating and sharing. 

Along with the free access to the fully featured web versions of the iWork suite of applications, users are also given a free 1gb of disc space to use on iCloud. If you have friends that don’t currently use Apple products and you want to show the quality of the applications, share a link. Even though I’m a big fan of Office 365, I personally find the iCloud apps much easier to use than Google apps. Since it is free to create an account, go for it if you currently do not own an Apple device and have been curious of the allure of iWork. 

Apple’s iMessage Can Cause Problems when Issuing Employees iPhones

 

iMessage iNo

The Technology and Marketing Law Blog recently had a post describing an employer lawsuit that included privacy infringement based claims against an employer for intercepting iMessages using his company supplied iPhone. Although the California Court ultimately rejected the claim, it had an interesting fact pattern that raises concerns for attorneys and employers.

The employee in the claim had been issued an iPhone from his employer. Upon being issued the iPhone, he associated the phone with his personal Apple iCloud account and enabled Apple’s iMessage. iMessage, unlike standard SMS text messages, allows sending and receiving text messages without an active cellular number. This means that if you register your cellular number with iMessage, your Apple account will allow you to send and receive iMessages on other devices with a broadband connection, even if you have no cellular connection. When you switch to a different cell phone (even if it is another iPhone), you must disable iMessages, or else your old iPhone will continue to receive iMessages if it is on a WiFi network, or another cellular account is registered with it.

The problem is that after the employee’s employment ended, he returned his company issued iPhone, and did not wipe the device or disable iMessages. The employee claims that his former employer continued to receive and review his text messages since his Apple iMessage account was not disabled. The California Court ultimately decided that the employee had no privacy claim against his former employer.

The reason that I found this case interesting, is because I am sure that there are plenty of attorneys in Delaware that are issued iPhones and/or iPads by their employers. This immediately causes concerns for me about employees taking steps to make sure that their data cannot be accessed once they leave their current employment. If you have linked a personal Apple iCloud account to your iPhone or iPad, some of your data created after starting a new job, may be accessed by a former employer. Both messages sent and received by iMessage, as well as any data stored in iCloud, may continued to be accessed on the old device until the Apple iCloud account is removed or your password is changed.

If you are currently using iMessages and iCloud on your employer-issued iPhone or iPad, you will want to make sure that you sever any connection before your employment ends. If you do not, there is a chance that text messages you receive in new employment may be intercepted by a former employer. If you are an employer issuing iPhones or iPads, you will want to have a clear policy on the type of personal information and accounts permitted on a company issued iDevice. Even for an employer, concerns arise that after an employee is terminated, information that was saved to iCloud (like documents created in Pages or Keynote) may continue to be available to former employees. For a managing partner at a law firm you need to know how confidential materials are being stored.

I would recommend not using iCloud and iMessage on any employer supplied iPad or iPhone. Although this eliminates some of the benefits of these services, it protects both an employee and employer from the concern of confidential information being accessed after the employment relationship has ended. Beyond the concern of private personal data being accessed, if an attorney has an old iPhone/iPad that is still receiving data from iCloud that can potentially be accessed by a former employer, there is a very real chance of violating your obligations under Rules 1.1 and 1.6 of the Delaware Rules of Professional Conduct. If you do use iMessage or iCloud, and you are not able to disable these services when employment is terminated, it is important that you immediately change your iCloud password to protect your data. Changing your password should protect you against a former employer accessing documents and data that apps store in iCloud. You should also contact Apple Support to have your old phone number deregistered from iMessage.

See Sunbelt Rentals, Inc v. Victor for the California District Court Decision.

 

Updating to iOS 8 or Getting a New iPhone 6? Backup with iTunes First!

With iOS 8 and the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus launching this week, it is important that attorneys remember to backup their devices before updating to a new phone or the new operating system. Although it is possible to use iCloud for backups, I have discussed the security concerns of doing so in the past. Your best bet is to use iTunes to create a local copy of your iPhone or iPad before applying any update.

The video above walks you through the process of connecting your iPhone or iPad to your computer and doing an iTunes backup. This should be done on a fairly regular basis to make sure that you can always easily restore your phone or iPad if they are lost, stolen, or malfunction. The process is quite simple, and after the initial backup, runs quickly for subsequent backups.

In addition to using iTunes because it is more secure. it is also nice to use iTunes because it speeds up the process of restoring your device if you have to. If you use iCloud it could take over a day to restore your device if you need to and you have to have a working internet connection during the entire restore process. With an iTunes backup, you simply plug your device into your computer, hit the restore button and at most it takes an hour or two to restore.

I hope that the video is helpful for those that have not used iTunes to backup in the past.

Serious Flaws Discovered in Apple iCloud Backup Security

Recently I posted an article explaining why attorneys should be concerned about the recent iCloud celebrity photo breach. At the time that I posted the article, details were just coming out about how these individuals had their confidential materials leaked. Since then, the leading theory has been that the celebrities had their iCloud iPhone backups accessed by malicious users using tools originally developed for law enforcement purposes. Christina Warren of Mashable recently posted a great article explaining just how easily she was able to hack her own iCloud backup. I recommend that all attorneys read her post to see just how easy some of this information can be obtained.  

My recommendation based on the events of the past week is that attorneys should not store confidential materials on iCloud until Apple makes the online service more secure. If you backup your iPhone or iPad using iTunes, you have the option of encrypting your backup with a separate password (that can and should be different from your iTunes password). Unfortunately this option is not available for iCloud backups. Without a second-factor authentication option or a separate encryption password for your online backups, a malicious user would only need to determine your iCloud password to access all your backed up data.

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You can turn off iCloud backup by going into your iOS settings and choosing iCloud. Within the initial iCloud settings you can choose Storage & Backup to choose whether to enable iCloud Backup. Within that settings panel simply disable iCloud backup to turn it of on your device.

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If you have other iOS devices, choose Manage Storage and from there you can delete backups from iCloud. You also should be careful that you understand what other apps on your device may be using iCloud to store data. To determine this, choose Documents & Data from within the initial iCloud settings. This will give you a list of apps that are storing data on iCloud. If you keep confidential client data within any of these apps, you may want to disable the ability of these apps to store documents and data in iCloud.

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It is important to remember that these recommendations are only if you have confidential information on your device. If you do choose to disable iCloud backups, it is important that you plug your device into your computer and backup using iTunes on a regular basis (and select the encryption option in iTunes). Email account passwords are not stored on the iCloud backup, so do not worry about this information being at risk if you do choose to use iCloud backup.

I am hoping that with the attention this has been receiving in the press that Apple quickly offers options to better secure iCloud in the near future. In the meantime, it is important that you at least understand what data on your device is being uploaded to the cloud and that you know if it is adequately protected.

Update: According to 9 to 5 Mac, Apple’s CEO Tim Cook has issued a statement promising that Apple will enable new notifications in the next two weeks to address some of the concerns discussed above. Notably individuals will begin to receive emails when a password is changed, when a backup is restored to a new device, when a device logs into iCloud for the first time, and users will be able to use two factor authentication for iCloud when iOS 8 is released. It is nice that Apple is promising quick improvements to better secure user’s data.

Read Christina Warren’s How I Hacked My Own iCloud Account, for Just $200 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Mashable/~3/I41sXRKDLao/

Celebrity iCloud Image Breach and Client Confidentiality

iCloud ConfidentialityI recently posted a new article on Mobile4Law.com about Client Confidentiality in light of the recent iCloud celebrity image leak that occurred over this past weekend. iCloud is a service offered by Apple that is available on every current iPhone and iPad that allows certain data on your device to be stored in the cloud. Over the weekend, it was reported that about 100 different celebrities had personal images accessed that were being stored using Apple’s iCloud service.

It is suspected that these photos were accessed by malicious users using a brute-force attack to guess passwords of the accounts affected. It appears that the only reason they were successful in the attack is because the accounts were using simple passwords, and that Apple did not lock accounts after a certain number of unsuccessful login attempts. 

In the article on Mobile4Law.com, it is explained why this should be a concern to individuals in the legal community that use cloud services for storage of confidential cloud information. I suggest that attorneys take a look at revised Rule 1.6 and the comments to that rule, and determine if they would have committed an ethical violation if confidential client information had been accessed from their account using this same attack.  

Steve Butler PhotoThis post was written by Steven Butler. Steven is a full-time Delaware attorney that limits his practice to Social Security Disability. Along with being a contributor for iPlugDelaware, he is a partner at Linarducci & Butler, PA.

Microsoft Giving 1 TB of OneDrive Storage to Entice Office 365 Subscriptions

One Drive

Microsoft announced a massive increase to OneDrive storage today for both paid and free accounts. Under the new plan, 15 GB of storage is available for free to all users of OneDrive (this is up from the 7 GB previously offered), and if you are a subscriber to Office 365, that number goes up to 1 TB. If you are not an Office 365 subscriber, you also have the option of purchasing 100 GB of storage for $1.99 per month, or 200 GB for $3.99 per month.

This news comes less than a month after Apple announced their upcoming iCloud Drive service that offered substantially lower rates than those currently being offered by competitors. For comparison sake, Apple announced that iCloud Drive would offer 5 GB of free storage, with 20GB to be $0.99 per month, 200 GB to be $3.99 per month, and 1 TB to be determined.

The biggest loser in these price decreases is Dropbox. Currently Dropbox offers 2 GB of storage for free, with 100 GB for $9.99 per month, and 200 GB for $19.99 per month. It will be interesting to see how long before Dropbox has to drop their prices to be competitive. Google Drive also offers 15GB of free storage and 100 GB for $1.99 per month and 1 TB for $9.99 per month.

If you were looking for a good reason to purchase Office 365, and the releases of Microsoft Office for the iPad were not enough for you, OneDrive storage definitely makes the subscription the most economical way I have found to obtain cloud storage, with the added bonus of Microsoft Office on your iPad and Desktop. It is also important to remember that you can still purchase a one year subscription to Office 365 from Amazon at $72.00.

iCloud Collaboration for Pages, Numbers and Keynote

Whats New

Last month Apple updated Pages, Numbers and Keynote to allow online collaboration between up to 100 users. With this update, you can now share your any document you create on iCloud and watch as another user makes edits. When sharing a document, you have the option of allow other users to just view the document, or to make edits. The individual that you share documents with does not have to have an iCloud account to view or edit the document. If more security is needed, you can even add password protection.

iCloud Sharing Options  Set Screen Name

Once you choose to share a document, you can send a link by email, or you can copy and paste the link to distribute in any other way that you choose. If you have your document open when another user logs in, you get to follow the edits that are made in real-time. If more than one user is in a document, you see each user represented by a different color. Users are prompted to enter their name when entering the document for the first time.

Collaborator 1st Screen

Apple did not create online collaboration in editing documents, but it is a nice free option that is available to any user of iCloud. To try these features, login to iCloud using a web browser at www.iCloud.com. I have used the online collaboration to easily share documents with other attorneys during presentations, and for preparing for meetings with multiple individuals will be presenting.

Although this is a great free tool, there are some notable limitations. The biggest disappointment that I had when trying this feature is that “Track Changes” cannot be used when sharing your document. This means that if you are not logged in at the same time as other collaborators, you cannot easily determine the changes that were made since the last time you accessed your document (you are not even warned that changes were made). Also, if one user is on the iPhone or iPad, you do not see real-time changes. The iPad and iPhone do not continuously refresh with the cloud, so it is best to use the collaboration only on the web, or there will be a delay in seeing the updates (for me it took about 1 minute for any changes to promulgate between the web and my iPad).

For more information about cloud collaboration using the iWork cloud apps, please visit Apple’s website or login to iCloud and see help.

 

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