Apple Watch Details Coming During Spring Forward Event?

Apple sent out invitations to the technology press today announcing a “Spring Forward” event on March 9, 2015. The event will be held at 10 am Pacific Time (1 pm on the East Coast) at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. Tim Cook has already alluded to an April launch of the Apple Watch, but so far it is just known that there will be three models of Apple Watches with each being available in 2 different sizes with various color options, and that the least expensive model will start at $349.

Apple Spring Forward EventThe expectation is that Apple will have working models of the Apple Watch on stage, with details of exactly how the watch works, when it will go on sale, and demo’s of Applications expected to be available when the Apple Watch launches. Since the event is being held so early in March, the hope is that pre-sales will begin before the end of the month, and that the actual Apple Watch will ship very early in April (like the original iPad). It is likely that select members of the press will also be provided demo units.

As always, iPlugDelaware will report all information on the new product launch, and be first in line to purchase it when available. There is no information about whether the event will be live-streamed, but we will continue to update as more information is available. For now, see our prior coverage of the Apple Watch announcement.

Update: Apple has announced that a live-stream will be available for those watching from home. Add to your calendar, and remember to visit http://apple.com/live on March 9, 2015 at 10am Pacific Time.

Microsoft Joins the Fitness Race with Microsoft Band

Microsoft announced the release of Microsoft Health and Microsoft Band on Wednesday¬†October 29, 2014. The Microsoft Band is a cross-platform smart fitness tracker that can also double as a watch. Appearance wise, the Microsoft Band is very similar to the Samsung Gear Fit, but unlike the Samsung device, the Band works with iPhone, Android and Microsoft Phone devices. The Band can display a clock, track steps, monitor sleep, continuously monitor heart rate and show notifications. Guided workouts are available from fitness partners, and all fitness data is compiled in Microsoft’s Health app. In addition to the heart rate sensor mentioned above, the Microsoft Band also includes 9 other sensors (including GPS) and can even monitor your sleep.

Microsoft Band Internals

The Microsoft Band is on sale at Microsoft Stores and online for $199.99 and comes in three different band sizes (all priced the same). The display can be personalized with different colors and backgrounds, but the Band itself is only available in black. Notifications, text messages and incoming call alerts can all be viewed on the Band, but you are not able to respond directly from the Band on iPhones. Microsoft has announced partnerships with MyFitnessPal, RunKeeper, mapmyfitness, and Starbucks to add additional functionality to the Band. The display is full-color touchscreen, and is expected to last 48 hours on a 90 minute charge.

This is an interesting product from Microsoft that offers some of the functionality of the upcoming Apple Watch at a much lower price, but a much less attractive appearance. The Band can perform most of the same tasks as a Pebble, but comes in a package that makes it look more comparable to a fitness bracelet. One of the odd things is that the display is horizontal across the widest part of your wrist (unlike a watch). This means that to read the display you must hold your arm straight out in front of you, instead of bent at the elbow like you normally do with a watch. To me this seems like a weird way to interact with notifications and comfortably view information.

I visited the Microsoft Store to view the watch, and it seems very big on the wrist. Unlike my Pebble, I was unable to pull my sleeve over the Microsoft Band. In order for the heart rate monitor to function, you must wear the Band with the face on the palm side of your wrist. This leaves a very ugly clasp on the top of your wrist. I also would be concerned that while using a computer, the Band would also be scratching against my desk.

Although I am happy that Microsoft is making products and applications that are cross-platform with Android and iOS, I am not sure if this specific product will appeal to a mass market. It is priced above the costs of most fitness bands (albeit with more features), but not attractive enough to be worn as a watch. It will be interesting to see if Microsoft expands its product range to include a more fashion-focused alternative in the future.